World

Taliban tells working women to stay home because soldiers aren’t trained to respect them

During a press briefing, Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid suggested women should stay home because soldiers are not trained to respect them.

Mujahid told reporters, “We have asked them to take time off from work until the situation gets back to a normal order and women-related procedures are in place, then they can return to their jobs once it’s announced.” In a previous briefing, Mujahid attempted to claim women will continue to play a role in Afghan society, however, under the rule of religious law.

“In accordance with Sharia law, we will allow women to work, women are an important element of the society, and we respect them. Where the society needs them, they will have active presence.” The rights of women, including attending school and work, are currently under fire by the organization as they eliminated women from Afghan society during its previous takeover.

Emerging reports further contradict Mujahid’s statement and suggest women are being attacked and killed for not following the unclear Sharia law. For instance, a woman was allegedly killed by Taliban authorities for leaving the house without a burqa, which is a scarf that covers the entire body.

In another incident, a woman was set on fire as punishment for her poor cooking. FBA reported, a former Afghani judge and activist, Najla Ayoubi, told SkyNews last week that according to her sources, women and girls are going into hiding across Afghanistan, while many others are being sold as sex slaves by the Taliban and being transported out of the country.

“They are forcing people to give them food and cook them food. A woman was put on fire because she was accused of bad cooking for Taliban fighters,” Ayoubi said. Furthermore, ​​authorities are going door-to-door to forcibly marry girls as young as 12 and forcing them into sex slavery.

The organization’s previous apathy towards women’s rights and current treatment suggests they will not maintain women’s rights that were restored after the US entered Afghanistan and granted throughout the last two decades. 

ARTICLE: ANTOINETTE AHO

MANAGING EDITOR: CARSON CHOATE
PHOTO CREDITS: NEW YORK TIMES

The following two tabs change content below.
Antoinette is a community college student in Sacramento, California. She is a Politics Editor at Fact Based America, a correspondent for Campus Reform, and a student journalist. She previously worked for Turning Point USA as a High School Coordinator.

Leave a Reply