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Ikea announces they are raising their prices by 9% due to supply chain issues

Swedish furniture giant Ikea will increase its prices by an average of nine percent next year due to ongoing supply and transportation issues.

Thursday’s announcement comes as pandemic-related shortages and shipping challenges have ramped up inflation and hurt economies globally, with consumers increasingly feeling the sting.

“Like many other industries, IKEA continues to face significant transport and raw material constraints driving up costs, with no anticipated break in the foreseeable future,” Ingka Group, the holding company that owns 90 percent of Ikea’s stores, said in a statement.

These higher costs, which are mostly being felt in North America and Europe, will now have to be passed on to customers, it added. “The average of the increase in Ingka Group is around 9% globally, with variations across Ingka Group countries and the range, reflecting localised inflationary pressures, including commodity and supply chain issues,” Ingka group said.

According to the company, Ikea franchisor Inter Ikea Group absorbed costs amounting to 250 million euros ($283 million) across 2021 due to these logistical tensions, which were exacerbated by the rebound in demand after the first phase of the pandemic.

Last month, Inter Ikea group reported a 17 percent drop in annual profits, attributing the dip to a steep increase in transport and raw material prices. Container transport prices are at record levels following the outbreak of the pandemic, which has disrupted maritime logistics.

At the same time, the franchisor behind the world’s largest furniture seller reported higher sales for the year at 25.6 billion euros, up eight percent.

But a global spike in energy prices, supply chain snags and surging demand has prompted runaway inflation. In the eurozone, inflation reached 4.9 percent over one year in November, a record high since the introduction of the single currency in 1999.

ARTICLE: PAUL MURDOCH

MANAGING EDITOR: CARSON CHOATE

PHOTO CREDITS: CNBC

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Paul, 37, is from Scotland in the UK, but currently lives and works in Bangkok. Paul has worked in different industries such as telemarketing, retail, hospitality, farming, insurance, and teaching, where he works now. He teaches at an all-girls High School in Bangkok. “It’s a lot of work, but I love my job.” Paul has an active interest in politics. His reason for writing for FBA is to offer people the facts and allow them to make up their own minds. Whilst he believes opinion columns have their place, it is also important that people can have accurate news with no bias.

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