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Former Walmart executive unveils plans for a futuristic utopian city in the desert

The cleanliness of Tokyo, the diversity of New York, and the social services of Stockholm: Billionaire Marc Lore has outlined his vision for a 5-million-person “new city in America” and appointed a world-famous architect to design it. Now, he just needs somewhere to build it — and $400 billion in funding.

The former Walmart executive unveiled plans for “Tolosa”, a sustainable metropolis that he hopes to create, from scratch, in the American desert. The ambitious 150,000-acre proposal promises eco-friendly architecture, sustainable energy production, and a purportedly drought-resistant water system. A so-called “15-minute city design” will allow residents to access their workplaces, schools, and amenities within a quarter-hour commute of their homes.

Although planners are still scouting for locations, possible targets include Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Arizona, Texas, and the Appalachian region, according to the project’s official website. The announcement was accompanied by a series of digital renderings by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), the architecture firm hired to bring Lore’s utopian dream to life.

Residential buildings covered with greenery and imagined residents enjoying abundant open space. With fossil-fuel-powered vehicles banned in the city, autonomous vehicles are pictured traveling down sun-lit streets alongside scooters and pedestrians.

A proposed skyscraper, dubbed Equitism Tower, is described as “a beacon for the city.” The building features elevated water storage, aeroponic farms, and an energy-producing photovoltaic roof that allows it to “share and distribute all it produces.”

The first phase of construction, which would accommodate 50,000 residents across 1,500 acres, comes with an estimated cost of $25 billion. The whole project would be expected to exceed $400 billion, with the city reaching its target population of 5 million within 40 years.

Funding will come from “various sources,” project organizers said, including private investors, philanthropists, federal and state grants, and economic development subsidies. Planners hope to approach state officials “very soon,” to welcome the first residents by 2030.

ARTICLE: PATEL CHAITANYA
MANAGING EDITOR: CARSON CHOATE
PHOTO CREDITS: NEW YORK POST

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