Politics

Former surgeon general says early mask guidance may have been “premature” and “wrong”

Former U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said COVID-19 mask guidance may be “premature” or “wrong” in the face of potentially dangerous new variants.

Adams served as surgeon general under former President Donald Trump, taking a prominent role throughout the early phase of the pandemic. He recently took to Twitter to voice his own regrets and concerns over mask mandates since then. “Last year Tony Fauci and I famously, prematurely, & wrongly advised against masks,” Adams wrote in a rare admission of a misstep. “I felt it was the best call at the time, but now regret it.”

“I’m worried the CDC also made a similarly premature, misinterpreted, yet still harmful call on masking in the face of [rising] delta variant.” He urged the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to instead advise people to get vaccinated and wear masks in areas with higher cases of COVID-19 until numbers start to decline. The CDC updated its guidance in May to say that fully vaccinated individuals no longer need to wear masks indoors or outdoors, nor do they need to socially distance either.

CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky praised the guidance at the time as a major step toward normalcy. However, the delta variant has increasingly taken focus in recent weeks as it became the leading strain of COVID-19 in a number of countries. The CDC said on July 6 that the delta variant is likely the dominant strain in the U.S. Fauci reiterated the CDC guidance on July 1, insisting that the agency’s “broad recommendation” was based on the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines. 

ARTICLE: PAUL MURDOCH

MANAGING EDITOR: CARSON CHOATE
PHOTO CREDITS: YAHOO NEWS

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