Science

Two remote-control cars developed with the help of high-school kids will compete in the first-ever contest on the MOON in 2021

Next year, the first-ever remote control car race will be held on the moon. The race is sponsored by Moon Mark – an entertainment and information industry. High school students have worked to build the cars and their cars will be sent on the moon by SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket in October 2021. 

After 8 weeks of qualifying by high schoolers from around the world, six teams of 5 members will compete to become the final two that will race on the moon. The challenges include e-gaming, drone racing, space commercialization, and entrepreneurship. Their adventures will be captured, produced, and globally distributed by Moon Mark so people can follow their progress on the build-up to the October launch.

Each car will weigh 5.5 lbs and the Lander will weigh, 6.6 lbs making it a total of 17.6 lbs. The cost of the launch is not yet revealed, yet some firms quote it as $5,44,000 per pound, making the cost of the mission approximately $10 million. 

Moon Mark is working with SpaceX along with other private firms like Lunar Outpost and export in developing its own rover vehicles. “We could not be more pleased to partner with Lunar Outpost, the industry’s leader in aerospace mobility,” said Mary Hagy, Moon Mark’s Founder and CEO. “Their expertise in developing lunar rovers ensures that our racing teams will have the technical background to accomplish the mission and leave a scientific legacy after the checkered flag waves.”

“Moon Mark’s mission of getting young people involved in aerospace and working toward utilizing space for the betterment of humanity is something that resonates with us,” said Justin Cyrus, Co-Founder and CEO of Lunar Outpost. “We look forward to enabling racers on the Moon and being a part of the journey to bring space to the world.”

Once on the lunar surface competitors will race their rovers remotely, navigating harsh terrain, racing around a sphere of cameras capturing every aspect. ‘We will have near real-time visuals, telemetry, and command and control via our partnership with Intuitive Machines. 

The racers built by Lunar Outpost will connect with the Intuitive Machines Lander via WiFi, and the Lander will send and receive telemetry, commands, and controls to and from the Earth to drive the racers.

ARTICLE: EJAZ SHAIKH

SCIENCE/HEALTH EDITOR: KYLE SMITH

PHOTO CREDITS: UNILAD

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