Science

Patients taking part in Moderna’s and Pfizer’s vaccine trials have experienced intense side effects

PHOTO CREDITS: IMMUNIZAIONINFO.COM

Three patients taking part in clinical trials for Moderna’s and Pfizer’s vaccine have experienced intense side effects, according to a report published by CNBC. Those side effects include high fever, pounding headaches, intense chills, and exhaustion.

According to the reports of CNBC, one of the participants in the Moderna study, a man named Luke Hutchison was given the second of two COVID-19 vaccine shots during the trial and was awake late at night with chills and a fever. Another participant in the Pfizer study experienced similar side effects to Hutchison after being administered the second dose of the two-dose vaccine.

Pfizer and BioNTech – the German-based biotech it is partnering with – as well as Moderna are considered by many to be among the front runners in the race for developing a COVID-19 vaccine. Pfizer/BioNTech’s BNT162b2 and Moderna’s mRNA-1273 are messenger RNA based candidates that have been developed relatively quickly and are now in the last stage of testing. Post-vaccination fever is normal as viruses/bacteria in vaccines cause an infection in the body which is required for protection from that particular disease. When a vaccine enters the body, it activates immunity cells in the body, which is a response to invasion by the organism causing fever. So, fever is an indication of a good immune response of the body, yet BNT162b2 and MRNA-1273 have not completed the full series of clinical trials, indicating that it is not yet clarified whether the vaccines are working or not.

Without being fully assured, vaccines can’t be officially declared. It could cause side effects on a mass scale. Vaccines for Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Polio, Small-Pox, and Influenza have a long history of safe use and were developed in line with requirements of regulatory agencies. “The traditional vaccine timeline is 15-20 years. That would not be acceptable here,” said Mark Feinberg, CEO of International Aids Vaccine Initiative, “There’s no way to come close to those timelines unless we take new approaches”, he added. “For now, however, no COVID-19 vaccine has completed a full series of clinical trials and reported data sufficient to warrant calling it a success, nor have any candidates been approved by a major regulator,” CNBC reported. 

ARTICLE: PATEL CHAITANYA

EDITOR: KYLE SMITH, SCIENCE EDITOR

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