Politics

Primaries in Kansas, Missouri, and Michigan: What We Learned

PHOTO CREDITS: NBC NEWS

Millions of Americans in Kansas, Missouri, and Michigan made their voices heard on Tuesday, as crucial primaries took place in each of the states. Among the races included: nationally watched races in Kansas, a race between two rivals in Michigan, and a long-time incumbent challenged in Missouri. ~

In Kansas, a number of interesting races took place. For one of the state’s senate seats, former law professor and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach struck fear into many Senate republicans, who were worried that some of his views could flip the Senate seat to the democrats for the first time in 90 years if he won the primary. However, Kobach lost by more than 50,000 votes to OB-GYN Dr. Roger Marshall, who received support from former Senator, Pat Roberts, but lacked support from President Trump, which worried many of his supporters. Kansas saw more change as incumbent representative of KS-2 Steve Watkins, who was charged with three felonies related to voter fraud earlier this month, was defeated by Kansas State Treasurer Jake LaTurner. ~

In Michigan, Brenda Jones challenged incumbent Rashida Tlaib, a member of the “squad”, who self-describe themselves as progressive first-term congresswomen of color. Tlaib beat Jones by a slim 300 votes in the 2018 primary, which was a six-way race. Despite all of the candidates in that race backing Jones, Tlaib claimed the primaries with 66% of the votes. This is most likely due to the fact that Jones joined the race relatively late, and struggled to raise funds. Additionally, Tlaib turned her campaign tools into a way to check up on residents and provide them with assistance during the Coronavirus pandemic, which local sources say helped her gain support among her district members. ~

In Missouri, Cori Bush, who lost the 2018 primary, once again challenged 10-term incumbent William Lacy Clay. The seat up for grabs has been in the Clay family since 1969, when William Clay Sr. first entered congress. Despite this, Bush edged out the Clay family by a little more than 4,000 votes. ~

ARTICLE: DANIEL ENGLAND

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